Monday, 21 July 2014

ANTHOLOGY 2014 Long List

ANNOUNCING: ANTHOLOGY LONG LIST 2014
The Anthology 2014 jury members Zavier Ellis, Hélène Guérin, Justin Hammond, Marcus Harvey and Jessica Lack have convened to select the 2014 long list, from which ten finalists will be selected to exhibit at CHARLIE SMITH LONDON in August. One winner will be selected from the exhibition and awarded a £2,000 cash prize. Please scroll down to view the 2014 long list.
LONG LIST
Hermione Allsopp
Chris Anthem
Kim Baker
Dan Beard
Dora Bendixen
Juan Bolivar
Cecilia Bonilla
Agnes Calf
Chris Campbell
Michal Cole
Michelle Conway
Emma Cousin
Ben Cove
Adam Dix
Susannah Douglas
Alexandra Flood
Susan Gofstein
Jonny Green
Florian Heinke
Chistopher Hudson
Sally Kindberg
Wouter van de Koot
Rachel Levitas
Florencia Levy
Enzo Marra
Darren Marshall
Lucy May
Claire Partington
Edd Pearman
Yoav Ruda
Wendy Saunders
Alexandra Sinopoulou
Susan Sluglett
Michael Slusakowicz
William Stein
Geraldine Swayne
Ilona Szalay
Julie Umerle
Charlie Warde
Ben Woodeson
Lisa Wright
CHARLIE SMITH LONDON
336 Old St, Shoreditch, London EC1V 9DR
+44 (0)20 7739 4055
www.charliesmithlondon.com

Saturday, 19 July 2014

THE ALCHEMY OF THE STREET by Edward Lucie-Smith

Zavier Ellis 'The End Of Days', 2014 Liquitex acrylic, spray paint, oil, tape, collage on board 200x300cm
ARTIST
Zavier Ellis
EXHIBITION
Type 1 Zealotry (curated by Edward Lucie-Smith)
EXHIBITION DATES
28th June - 25th July at the Cock'n'Bull Gallery, Shoreditch

THE ALCHEMY OF THE STREET
By Edward Lucie-Smith

Zavier Ellis combines two roles: that of being an internationally known avant-garde artist, and that of being a successful dealer. Self-evidently, each role feeds into the other. His perception of what is creatively vital and new, which is the driving force of his own practice as an artist, also informs the choices he makes as a dealer.

The progress of his own art has been meditative and deeply considered, which is one reason why this is his first solo show in London for a decade, though his work has made a considerable recent impact in museum presentations in Europe and the United States. What he offers represents a combination of elements, often things that seem to stand at extreme distances from one another. In particular, it combines a fascination with graffiti with an equal fascination with the esoteric. This, in turn, acts as a reminder that the graffiti we casually encounter in the street are themselves often part of a secret language of signs, revealing their real meanings only to the informed and initiated.

This popular signage utters things that at first seem fragmentary and inchoate, yet somehow of deep psychological significance to modern urbanites who are prepared to pay attention. Indeed, the process of puzzling out, which art works of this kind impose on the spectator, somehow tend to bond us to them more closely. That is, what begins as a communication, from one sensibility to another, evolves into something that more closely resembles a dialogue.

What Ellis says about his own work is this: “Rather than street art I would claim a fascination with the street itself, or the urban environment/the city… The elements my eyes are most drawn to are signing writing, posters, old faded advertisements painted directly on to brickwork, roughly drawn graffiti, street markings…” He sees these elements as being “part of a battle to render something permanent from the fleeting and ephemeral.”

In addition to this Ellis has an interest in the esoteric – in concealed or half-concealed codings of a more traditional kind. He notes, for example, that he has created a new symbol by fusing the Star of David and the Christian cross. The lettering that appears prominently in his work offers hidden messages, using a simple but ancient encrypting technique called the Atbash cipher. In this the alphabet is cut into two equal parts, with the second set of letters running backwards, underneath but exactly parallel with the first. To code a message, each letter is simply exchanged for the one immediately above or beneath it.

In a certain sense, this seems more reminiscent of the way that contemporary poetry operates, rather than like the mechanisms of the contemporary visual arts. I’m reminded of something that the poet Ted Hughes said in an interview given in 1996, towards the end of his life: “I feel that my poems are obscure. I give the secret away without giving it. People are so dumb they don’t know I’ve given the secret away.”

The artistic influences that Ellis acknowledges are not the Graffiti artists popular in New York in the 1980s, but earlier Modernists such as Schwitters (whose impact is very evident in some of the works), also Tapiès and Robert Rauschenberg. He also cites the impact made on him by the photography of Brassaï, who made a large number of images of graffiti, collected under the rubric The Language of the Wall.

He sees his output as being the product of research as much as it is the product of what he sees around him in the contemporary urban context. There are references that are overt, others that are deliberately hidden – to religion, to occult beliefs, to insanity (and the links between these three topics). There is populism, but also the employment of quite elaborate symbolic language(s) in the plural. Not just the use of verbal codes but also of coded colour, and of codes based on measurements, based on the width of the lettering that appears so frequently and prominently in these compositions.

Essentially much of the art of the present day can be regarded as enacting a struggle for primacy between populist and elitist impulses. The problem, often enough, is that this struggle is often only semi-conscious. There is a desire somehow to marry the structures of official art with the anti-official impulses of the avant-garde tradition. It is refreshing to encounter art that openly acknowledges this situation and tries to analyse it and use it as a source of creative energy.


Zavier Ellis’ work as an artist seems to me a sophisticated meditation on problems that he also encounters every day in other departments of his life. This work does not offer settled answers. What it does is to formulate probing questions about the society we live in, and about the urban environment (a direct product of this society) that, sometimes suffocatingly, surrounds us.

Thursday, 3 July 2014

'Kill All Monsters' by Jessica Lack

JESSICA LACK
Same As It Ever Was
ARTIST
ALEX GENE MORRISON
EXHIBITION
Same As It Ever Was
EXHIBITION DATES
Friday June 27th – Saturday July 26th 2014 
GALLERY HOURS
Wednesday-Saturday 11am-6pm or by appointment

'Demon', 2014 Acrylic & oil on canvas 90x65cm

Kill All Monsters by Jessica Lack

CHEMICAL WARFARE, I wrote in large letters next to Alex Gene Morrison’s name in a notebook from 2002. It is all I need to recall the painting he was exhibiting - a queasily coloured image in oil called ‘I see dragons in your eyes’ depicting a hooded form marching through radioactive slime. Why I chose to describe it in this way has, I think, something to do with the time and place. Morrison was among a group of artists working out of a makeshift studio/exhibition space in Dalston who painted the motifs of their youth; skulls, arcade games, schlock horror and thrash metal (co-incidentally Chemical Warfare is a song by Slayer) – the detritus of cold war politics and the computing revolution which skate culture appropriated in the 1980s.

Until the new Millennia, the 1980s had been in aesthetic fall out, but now artists were reviving certain aspects of this bombastic era. There were Kirsten Glass’ slick collages inspired by the David Salle School of glamour and Luke Caulfield’s urban teenagers wearing their allegiances to Death Metal on their t-shirts. Exhibitions like the Barbican’s ‘Game On’, presented a considered historical view of the video game and the Japan pavilion at the Venice Biennale gave itself over to the golden arches. Even so, the idea of Donkey Kong, Gremlins, and that particular 80s palette which can only be described as Ocean Pacific, still engendered a certain amount of scepticism. For many, this renewed interest by young artists in such 80s icons as Pac-Man, was viewed by the gallery going public with the nonplussed apprehension of coming across a Zombie and finding they had no wall to jump over.

Morrison stopped painting in the colours of a low-budget video rental store a few years ago, yet some of the motifs he used from that time have remained. In particular the oddly-formed prehistoric faces, one of which in ‘Skull’ is just discernable in the gloom of the canvas like a cave painting weakly illuminated by the glow of a dying flashlight. The face could be a crude self-portrait or a Jungian archetype, but equally the primitivism could refer to the rudimentary beings developed in the 1980s in early video games.

Another image Morrison has used before is the amorphous form in ‘Black Bile’, which is as close to what I imagine the parasitic extra-terrestrial in ‘The Thing’ is. He was nominated for the John Moores Painting Prize in 2009 with a version of this image, except here the paint is as glossy as shellac and the brush marks mirror the grooves of a 12inch record. Like all of the works in this new series, Morrison has reduced his palette almost entirely to black, purple and red, colours favoured by Heavy Metal, and it is no co-incidence that certain themes embraced by this subculture - witchcraft, Nazis, crucifixes - are alluded to in Morrison’s work.

I get the feeling Morrison is finally beginning to enjoy his black period. He has often described his art as tragicomic and has always been drawn to the dumber aspects of the subjects he paints. He will go for the melting faces and pickled corpses in horror movies over the spine chilling atmosphere any day and the same goes for this new series, which ironically sees Morrison’s lighter side emerge from the rather severe abstracts of a couple of years ago. Both ‘Raw Sorcery (RAM)’ and ‘Arise’ could easily sit on the back cover of a Metallica album. The sexual overtones of ‘Raw Sorcery’ (a medieval battering ram bursting through a lightning bolt) are as blatant as the Satanic crucifix is in ‘Arise’ and as a result borrow from the dopey humour that saved Thrash Metal from developing the self-aggrandizing masturbatory excesses of their Prog rock predecessors.

The Marxist philosopher Slavoj Zizek argues that the appropriation of swastikas and other fascist symbols in Heavy Metal is a way of ‘de-semanticizing’ totalitarian ideology, essentially neutralising fascism by emphasizing its own absurdities. The German artist Anselm Kiefer achieved a similar thing in the late 1960s, when he photographed himself in mock-heroic poses giving the Nazi salute by public monuments.

It is no great surprise that Heavy Metal emerged in the right wing era of Reagan and Thatcher but that it continues to be thought of as proto-fascist. In ‘Shadow’ and ‘Sinister’ Morrison presents two paintings that could be said to confront this paradox. The former depicts a black right hand evocative of cave paintings and healing Shamanic rituals, the latter depicts a red slash against a black canvas that runs unusually from top left to bottom right. This is sometimes called a ‘sinister diagonal’ from the Latin word sinistra, which originally meant ‘left’ before it came to mean ‘evil’ or ‘unlucky’. Morrison paints this accursed shard in a primary red, liberating it from the crepuscular background. It could be an act of redemption, and that’s important, because there’s nothing a Metal band loves more than more than delivering salvation. 

BIOGRAPHICAL
BORN
1977
EDUCATION
1999 – 2002: MA in Fine Art, Royal Academy Schools; 1996 – 1999: BA (Hons) in Fine Art, Loughborough University School of Art
SELECTED EXHIBITIONS
2010: The Reflected Gaze, Torrance Art Museum, Torrance; 2009: The Future Can Wait (curated by Zavier Ellis & Simon Rumley), Old Truman Brewery, London; Hexen Reflex (one person), Mark Moore Gallery, Los Angeles; 2008: The Past is History (curated by Zavier Ellis & Simon Rumley), Changing Role Gallery, Naples & Rome; New London School (curated by Zavier Ellis & Simon Rumley), Mark Moore Gallery, Los Angeles; 2006: Icons, Chungking Projects, Los Angeles; Unnatural Selection (one person), Sartorial Contemporary Art, London; 2005: Maji Jabii!! Fucking Brilliant!!, Tokyo Wondersite, Tokyo; New London Kicks, Wooster Projects, New York; The Sun Also Rises, Rockwell, London; 2004: Born, Cry, Eat, Shit, Fuck, Die, Rockwell, London
COLLECTIONS
Marc Coucke, Ghent; Jean Pigozzi, Geneva; David Roberts, London; Dr Rainer Schiweck, Munich; Howard Tullman, Chicago; private collections in Germany, United Kingdom & United States

Alex Gene Morrison - Same As It Ever Was

Alex Gene Morrison
Same As It Ever Was
EXHIBITION DATES
Friday June 27th – Saturday July 26th 2014 
GALLERY HOURS
Wednesday-Saturday 11am-6pm or by appointment

'Skull', 2014 Oil on canvas 92x66cm
CHARLIE SMITH LONDON is delighted to present Alex Gene Morrison with his second one person exhibition at the gallery.

This new collection of paintings signifies a culmination of ideas that Morrison has been exploring for over ten years. There is a distinctively anthropological feeling to his images of skulls, forests, monsters and totemic abstract forms that call to mind the primitive and tribal. Signifiers of fire and raw electrical energy convey thoughts of destruction, transformation and re-animation via elemental forces. Morrison reminds us that there are embedded, archetypal elements within us that abridge modern and primeval man. Simultaneously, ongoing obsessions with horror and sci-fi movies; video games; sub cultural design; alternative music and the oppressive, unrelenting rhythms of Doom Metal all seep into and out of the work.

This sense of deep time, which is intrinsic to the work, is coupled with a knowing enquiry into Modern abstract painting, where Morrison references formalist tropes that were defined by 20th century avant-garde movements including Suprematism, Vorticism, Abstract Expressionism and Neo-Geo. Inherent within all of these was a departure from representation and gravitation towards a search for purity of expression and the universal via abstraction. Morrison intelligently absorbs these ideological and painterly languages, and in doing so, creates a unique and alternative visual language that invites his audience to go behind the surface through fractures, splits and tears. Rendered in dark, textured paint and in combination with his use of archetypal simulacra, Morrison presents us with resonant, metaphysical paintings.

For images and further information please contact direct@charliesmithlondon.com

BIOGRAPHICAL
BORN
1975
EDUCATION
2000 – 2002: MA in Painting, Royal College of Art; 1997 – 2000: BA (Hons) in Fine Art, City and Guilds of London Art School
SELECTED EXHIBITIONS
Selected Exhibitions: 2013: Saatchi Gallery & Channel 4’s New Sensations and THE FUTURE CAN WAIT, B1, Victoria House, London; 2012: Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, Royal Academy of Arts, London; Ha Ha what does this represent, Standpoint Gallery, London; 2011: Video in Britain Today, Bermondsey Project Space, London; Polemically Small, Klaipeda Culture Communication Centre, Klaipeda; THE FUTURE CAN WAIT presents: Polemically Small, Torrance Art Museum, Torrance; 2010: Fade Away, Transition Gallery, London; Dark Matter (one person), CHARLIE SMITH LONDON, London; The Term “Reality”, Paul Stolper, London; New British Painting, Gallery Kalhama & Piippo Contemporary, Helsinki; 2008: John Moores Contemporary Painting Prize 25, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool; 2007: Adrift (one person), The Fishmarket, Northampton; Nature and Society, Dubrovnik Museums, Croatia; 2006: Vile Lure (one person), Rockwell Gallery, London; Artists Choice, Leisure Club Mogadishni, Copenhagen;  2005: Maji Jabii!! Fucking Brilliant!!, Tokyo Wondersite, Tokyo; Hydrophobia, Zinger Presents, Tilburg; New London Kicks, Wooster Projects, New York; Faux Realism, Royal Academy Pump House Gallery, London; The Darkest Hour, Leisure Club Mogadishni, Copenhagen;  2004: Search and Destroy (one person), Rosy Wild Gallery, London; If You Go Down to the Woods Today, Rockwell Gallery, London; Uneven Surfaces, temporarycontemporary, London; Zombie, Gallery Ude, Düsseldorf; Born Cry Eat Shit Fuck Die, Rockwell Gallery, London; 2001: Modern Love, Hobbypop Museum, Düsseldorf; Modern Love, VTO Gallery, London; Rockwell, Rockwell Gallery, London

COLLECTIONS
David Roberts, London  
Private collections in France, Germany, United Kingdom & United States


336 Old Street, London EC1V 9DR , United Kingdom | +44 (0)20 7739 4055 | direct@charliesmithlondon.com | www.charliesmithlondon.com
Wednesday–Saturday 11am–6pm or by appointment

Saturday, 24 May 2014

'FLEURSDUMAL' Curated by Dolly Thompsett Exhibition Dates : Friday May 9th - Saturday June 7th 2014 at CHARLIE SMITH LONDON



FLEURSDUMAL

Curated by Dolly Thompsett
Emma Bennett, Michael Boffey, G L Brierley, Bernhard Martin, Neal Rock, Dolly Thompsett
PRIVATE VIEW
Thursday May 8th 6.30-8.30pm

EXHIBITION DATES
Friday May 9th - Saturday June 7th 2014

GALLERY HOURS
Wednesday-Saturday 11am-6pm or by appointment

‘The beautiful is always strange’, said Baudelaire.  The artists in this show demonstrate within their painterly flourishes a strange beauty that alludes to a sense of corruption and to  the festering nature of an often hidden aspect of human consciousness.  The work selected relates to Baudelaire’s collection of 19th century poems ‘Les Fleurs du mal’ by embracing an awareness of  death, degeneracy and pain. The six artists in the exhibition have developed visual vocabularies that echo Baudelaire's syntax in  order to elucidate something, something that speaks most strangely of beauty. Within these paintings a moment of expression is fashioned by means of art that truly speaks of life, like a briefly blossoming  flower that feeds from the decomposing carcasses of beasts, great and small, and from the sun above.

Dolly Thompsett



Dolly Thompsett
'The Secret Life of Mrs Andrews'
Acrylic, ink, mixed media on patterned upholstery linen
2014
90cm x 67cm





Dolly Thompsett
'Europa'
Acrylic, ink, mixed media on patterned upholstery linen
2014
31cm x 41cm






Bernhard Martin
'I actually wanted to make a picture of love'
Oil on raw canvas
2014
80cm x 70cm





G L Brierley
'Gertrude'
Oil on panel
2014
30cm x 40cm





Emma Bennett
'Watching the Dark'
Oil on canvas
2013
122cm x 91.5cm





Emma Bennett
'A Weightless Quiet'
Oil on oak panel
2013
25cm x 20cm













SAM JACKSON - COLOSSAL YOUTH ( Part 2 ) March 27th - May 3rd 2014



SAM JACKSON

Colossal Youth (Part 2)
PRIVATE VIEW Thursday March 27th 6:30-8:30pm
EXHIBITION DATES Friday March 28th – Saturday May 3rd 2014
GALLERY HOURS Wednesday-Saturday 11am-6pm or by appointment

CHARLIE SMITH LONDON is delighted to present Sam Jackson with his third one person exhibition at the gallery.

‘Colossal Youth (Part 2)’ represents the second phase of a body of work that takes as its starting point the topography of youth sub-culture, with the first phase being Jackson’s recent solo presentation at Volta New York. Influenced by both contemporary and historical high and low culture, Jackson draws here on the iconic photography of Derek Ridgers. Documenting street and club culture in the 1970’s and 80’s, Ridgers surveyed the vanguard of punk, skinheads and new romantics. The raw urgency and do-it-yourself attitudes embedded within these movements are mirrored in Jackson’s instinctively guttural paintings, where his portraits and figures are hewn with text that recalls rough, homemade tattoos and graffiti. The text represents a cognitive statement and a definitive point of reference while the subjects themselves project a sense of contemplative melancholy.    

Jackson’s sexual paintings range from mildly erotic to graphically pornographic. They refer to the overt sexualisation of the postmodern era that manifested itself stylistically in the 1970’s in punk and fetish, since when such underground tropes have inevitably come to occupy mainstream culture, encouraged by evermore open media coverage; absorption into high street fashion; de-marginalisation of sexual minorities; and increasing prevalence of internet pornography. This evermore conspicuous sexuality is absorbed by Jackson and filtered from image to painterly surface, undergoing a shift where the transgressive is interwoven with a unique delicacy.

The subjects in Jackson’s paintings, therefore, derive from various sources, reflecting current tendencies in an image obsessed society in the internet age, where traditional notions of private and public access have been transformed. Images from Polaroids, magazines, video clips and the internet are used to explore the worlds of DIY tattoos, addiction, homemade and amateur pornography, fantasy, excess, youth culture, violence, Baroque and Renaissance painting, failure, literature and music.  

BIOGRAPHICAL
BORN 1977
EDUCATION 2004-2007: MA Fine Art, Royal Academy Schools; 2000-2003: BA (Hons) Fine Art (First Class), Middlesex University

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2014: The Harsh Reality: Modern & Contemporary British Painting, The Sainsbury Centre for the Visual Arts, Norwich; 2013: Saatchi Gallery & Channel 4’s New Sensations and THE FUTURE CAN WAIT (curated by Zavier Ellis, Simon Rumley & Rebecca Wilson),
B1, Victoria House, London Porträts, Galerie Rigassi, Bern; 2012: The Serpent’s Tail Witzenhausen Gallery,  Amsterdam; 2011: The Fearful Joy, CHARLIE SMITH LONDON (Solo); Everyday (curated by Tony Benn), Ruskin Gallery, Cambridge; 2010: Pokerface, Koraalberg Contemporary Art Gallery, Antwerp; Ray Lowry London Calling, Idea Generation, London (touring to New York & Tokyo); New British Painting (curated by Zavier Ellis & Pilvi Kalhama), Gallery Kalhama & Piippo, Helsinki; 2009: Vas Deferens, CHARLIE SMITH LONDON (Solo); British Art Now (curated by Edward Lucie-Smith), Werkstatt Galerie, Berlin; The Cabinet, BRAUBACHfive, Frankfurt (Solo); A Stain upon the Silence (curated by Chris Shilling, Chris Page & Gaboy Gaynor), St. Martins College of Art, London; Anticipation (curated by Kay Saatchi & Catriona Warren), Selfridges, London; UK Best Graduates, White Box Gallery, New York; The Past is History (curated by Zavier Ellis & Simon Rumley), Changing Role Gallery, Naples & Rome; New London School (curated by Zavier Ellis & Simon Rumley), Mark Moore Gallery, LA ; The R.A.5, Lennon Weinberg, New York

COLLECTIONS Javier Baz, Denver; Carlos Fragoso, New York; Glen Luchford, New York; David Roberts, London; Sir Norman Rosenthal, London; Kay Saatchi, London
Private collections in Belgium, Colombia, France, Germany, Netherlands, Switzerland, United Kingdom & United States








Sam Jackson
'If We Could Go Back'
Oil on board
2014
35cm x 30cm




Sam Jackson
'Letz Rock Now'
Oil on board
2014
26cm x 20cm




Sam Jackson
'Life & You'
Oil on board
2014
17.5cm x 14.5cm



Sam Jackson
'This Too Shall Pass'
Oil on board
2014
20cm x 14cm



Sam Jackson
'Our Love Will Always Live On'
Oil on board
2014
20cm x 14cm

































THE GREAT WAR exhibition at CHARLIE SMITH LONDON February 14th - March 22nd 2014



Hugh Mendes
'Sgt Stubby'
Oil on linen
2014
30cm x 20cm





Hugh Mendes
'On christmas day'
Oil on linen
2014
30cm x 20cm





Florian Heinke
'Dazzle'
Acrylic on untreated cotton
2014
100cm x 80cm




Florian Heinke
'War Loves Us'
Acrylic on untreated cotton
2013
100cm x 80cm




Hugh Mendes
'Harry Patch 'War is ...'
Oil on linen
2009
30cm x 30cm




Eric Manigaud
'Tranchee de Caloone'
Pencil and graphite powder on paper
2013
140cm x 230cm




Hugh Mendes
'war activists'
Oil on linen
2014
35cm x 50cm













Saturday, 1 February 2014

The Great War
Harold de Bree, Florian Heinke, Eric Manigaud, Hugh Mendes
Private View
Thursday February 13th 6.30-8.30pm
Exhibition Dates
Friday February 14th – Saturday March 22nd 2014
Gallery Hours
Wednesday-Saturday 11am-6pm or by appointment

CHARLIE SMITH LONDON presents four European artists to mark the centenary of the beginning of The Great War.

Working across mediums in installation, drawing and painting, Harold de Bree (Netherlands), Florian Heinke (Germany), Eric Manigaud (France) and Hugh Mendes (United Kingdom) have made new work in response to the brief. Each artist was specifically invited by gallery director Zavier Ellis for their ongoing investigations into world war, with it being a dominant theme in all of their practices. Hailing from European countries that played significant roles between 1914 and 1918, each artist approaches the theme with profound and reflective endeavour.

Dutch artist Harold de Bree is known for making large scale installation and sculpture that replicates military hardware and public monuments. Playing on historical institutional tropes, de Bree poses complex questions about power, culture and nationalism. In this exhibition de Bree will present a site specific piece that resembles a WWI monument that might be found anywhere in Europe, but which also acts as a border marker. With wheels attached beneath, it is possible for the monument to move, hence commenting on the historical flux of national borders, and the implication of mutable frontlines that are defined by the processes of war and politics.       

German artist Florian Heinke uses black paint exclusively as a "radical medium". His subjects are derived from traditional and digital media sources and often combine text to create an aesthetic that suggests a polemic poster or advertisement. Heinke’s paintings are aggressive, political and nihilistic. This unrestrained approach is intended to provoke the audience into an emotive reaction, much in the same way that corporate businesses and political parties manipulate the public with powerful combinations of imagery and slogans. Heinke’s confrontational strategy reveals a deep lying cynicism of the modern age but also an artist who is profoundly concerned with current socio-political issues.     

French artist Eric Manigaud is renowned for his impeccable large scale photorealist drawings. Derived from historical sources, Manigaud’s choice of imagery is based on monumental historical moments of the modern age. For this exhibition Manigaud has returned to his ongoing war series, which to date has included depictions of WWI trench warfare; WWI injured soldiers; and WWII bombed cities. Focusing on the impact of war in his homeland, Tranchée de Calonne is a devastating drawing over two metres wide that depicts the skeletal remains of soldiers killed near the famous road, which was a site of ferocious fighting during WWI and represented for some time the eastern French front.         

British artist Hugh Mendes was born on Armistice Day in a British military hospital in Germany. His mother was a military nurse and his father a British Intelligence code breaker. Mendes is recognized for his paintings of newspaper pages, where he has continued to relentlessly track and transcribe obituaries and war stories. Mendes approaches WWI with irony and scepticism, choosing to focus on the absurd and whimsical, but with underlying pathos. His obsessive paintings are a personal reflection on the obsessions of the media. Sgt. Stubby, for example, is a recreation of a photograph of WWI’s most decorated war dog, who served 18 months in the trenches of France serving the US army. Stubby was decorated for, amongst other things, saving injured comrades in no man’s land, capturing German spies and detecting gas attacks.    

In combination these artists will form a thought provoking exhibition that ruminates on the meaning and effects of war.

For images and further information please contact the gallery on direct@charliesmithlondon.com or +44 (0)20 7739 4055  

BIOGRAPHICAL
Name
Harold de Bree
Born
1966
Education
1991-1995 Royal Academy of Art, Den Hague
Selected Exhibitions
2013: ‘s Gravenhaarlem, Haarlem, Nieuwe Vide; Stealth Drones, Twente Biennale; Joan of Art, Maldives Pavilion,  Venice Biennale; Collapsed Bailey Bridge, Gemeentemuseum, Den Hague; SOS Sauna Boat; Joan of Art, Five Years Gallery, London; Am Tisch, Schau Fenster, Berlin; 2012: Being Homonym, Uhm Collective, Den Hague; 2011: I Should Have Done That, Nest, Den Hague; 2010: Bipolar, Plan-d, Düsseldorf ; 2008: Manifesta 7, European Biennale of Contemporary Art; Harold de Bree & Carol Rama, Galerie West, Den Hague; 2007: Lost Tongues Rediscovered, Stroom, Den Hague; 2005: TYP XVII, Gem Museum voor actuele Kunst, Den Hague; 2004: I Work, Museum of Tampere; 2003: Entrance A-37, Raumars Art Museum
Collections
Private collections throughout Europe

Name
Florian Heinke
Born
1981
Education
2009: MA of Fine Arts, Städelschule, Frankfurt am Main; 2005: Städelschule, Frankfurt am Main; 2004-2005: Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz
Solo Exhibitions
2010: Savee Couture, Velvet, Frankfurt am Main; The last curs fight the bricks, Galerie Perpetuél, Frankfurt am Main; Florian H., Moloko, Frankfurt am Main; 2009: Still my own idol, PSM-Gallery, Berlin; Florian Heinke, bKi, Darmstadt; Apart from heaven, Galerie La Brique, Frankfurt am Main; 2008: A fast way downstairs, Sammlung-Lenikus, Wien; Paradise overdosed, Galerie Campagne Premiere, Berlin; Pervers durchs Paradies, Kunstverein Familie Montez, Frankfurt am Main
Selected Group Exhibitions
2011: When Poets Die, Galerie Anita Beckers, Frankfurt am Main; 2010: Home - EAST/WEST Project; Dam Stuhlgarter Gallery Brooklyn, Berlin; Nobel geht die Welt zu Grunde, Atelierfrankfurt, Frankfurt am Main; Setzen! 5!, Galerie Wolfstädter, Frankfurt am Main; 2009: Viel vor, viel dahinter (2 Jahre Artsite.tv), Kunstverein, Frankfurt am Main; Die Dinge des Lebens, Galerie P13, Heidelberg; Dude, where´s my carreer?, Absolventenausstellung Städelschule , Zollamt MMK, Frankfurt am Main; Lob der Kritik. Ihre Meinung ist uns wichtig, Galerie Frühsorge; 2008: Dirty Storm, Raum SOD, Frankfurt am Main; Simple exploding men, Artnews Projects, Berlin
Collections
Private collections throughout Europe

Name
Eric Manigaud
Born
1971
Education
1996: Agrégation d’Arts Plastiques, University of Fine Arts, Saint Etienne; 1993: Maîtrise d’Arts Plastiques, University of Fine Arts, Saint Etienne
Solo Exhibitions
2013: The Shadow Line, CHARLIE SMITH london, London; Klinikum Weilmunster, Olivier Houg Galerie, Lyon; Dreams and Ruins, Galerie d'Art Moderne, Sarajevo
Selected Group Exhibitions
2013: Paper, Saatchi Gallery, London; 2012: Saatchi Gallery & Channel 4’s New Sensations and The Future Can Wait (curated by Zavier Ellis, Simon Rumley & Rebecca Wilson), B1, Victoria House, London; Anthology, CHARLIE SMITH london, London; 2010: Figure Toi!, FRAC Haute-Normandie, Rouen; Fake!, Stedelijk Museum, Alost; 2009: L'Afrique en Noir et Blanc, Musée Senlecq, l’Isle-Adam; Fragile, Museum of Art, Mannyun-dong Seo-gu Daejeon, Corée; 2006: 1914-1918, Musée d'Histoire du XXème Siècle, Estivareilles; 2005, Focalise, les voies de l’optique, Musée d’Art et d’Industrie, Saint Etienne
Collections
Saatchi Gallery, London; The SØR Rusche Collection, Oelde / Berlin; FRAC Haute-Normandie, Rouen; Landesmuseen Scloss Gottorf, Schleswig; Paul Dini Museum, Villefranche-sur-Saône; Julian and Stephanie Grose, Adelaide; Randal J. Kirk, Virginia; private collections in Belgium, France, United Kingdom & United States

Name
Hugh Mendes
Born
1955
Education
2000- 2001: MA Fine Art, City and Guilds of London Art School; 1975-1978: BA (Hons) Fine Art, Chelsea School of Art, London
Solo Exhibitions
2013: D.OA. the Good, the Bad and the Ugly, Gusford, Los Angeles; 2012: Obituaries, CHARLIE SMITH london, London ; 2011: 9/10/11, KENNY SCHACHTER / ROVE, London
Selected Group Exhibitions
2012: Saatchi Gallery & Channel 4’s New Sensations and The Future Can Wait, Victoria House, London; Polemically Small (curated by Edward Lucie-Smith), Klaipeda Culture Communication Centre, Klaipeda; The Future Can Wait presents: Polemically Small, Torrance Art Museum, Torrance; 2010: Press Art, Museum der Moderne, Salzburg; 2008: New London School (curated by Zavier Ellis & Simon Rumley), Mark Moore Gallery, Los Angeles; 2006: New London Kicks, Wooster Projects, New York; 2005: Fuckin’ Brilliant, Tokyo Wonder Site, Tokyo; Art News, Raid Projects, Los Angeles; 2004: Forest, Rockwell Gallery, London; 2003: Chockafukingblocked, Jeffery Charles Gallery, London; 2002: Yesteryearnowadays, Hales Gallery, London
Collections
Jerry Hall, London; Peter Nobel, Zurich; Kenny Schachter, London; Steve Shane, New York; Bill Wyman, London; Wooster Projects, New York; private collections in China, Germany, United Kingdom & United States





de Bree, Harold 'Koning Willem II', 2012 Mixed media




Heinke, Florian 'War Loves Us 1', 2013 Acrylic on untreated cotton 100x80cm




Manigaud, Eric 'Tranchée de Calonne, 1918', 2013 Pencil & graphite powder on paper  140x230cm 




Mendes, Hugh 'Sgt Stubby', 2013 Oil on linen 30x20cm